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Red Hat generates $1 billion in revenue


Software company makes $1.13 billion revenue in 2011

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Red Hat is the first open source software company to generate a billion dollars in annual revenue.

Revenue was $1.13 billion, up 25% from the year earlier, and net income was $146.6 million, up from $107.3 million the year earlier, Red Hat announced in its financial results yesterday for the fiscal year ending February 29.

Passing the $1 billion milestone is "a statement about open source, and the relative ubiquity of open source. Very few companies have been able to reach that mark," CEO Jim Whitehurst said. "It's quite a statement that we've been able to achieve that with a radically different business model."

With a billion or more in annual revenue, Red Hat joins a somewhat elite league of midsized enterprise software companies, such as OpenText and Nuance Communications.

"The billion-dollar figure is a kind of a magic figure for technology companies," said Charles King, chief analyst at Pund-IT. Though an arbitrary milepost, it's a good indicator that the company executives have found a formula not only for success, but for maintaining success.

Perhaps more significantly, Red Hat's success validates the idea that open-source software can form the basis of a viable business model.

"Red Hat's success is a testament to the role it played in bringing Linux to the mainstream, and the continued shift towards open source in the enterprise," said Mark Shuttleworth, founder of fellow Linux distributor Canonical.

When Red Hat held its IPO (Initial Public Offering) in 1999, the idea of making money from open source software was not a proven concept. Although open source software was widely used then by academics and the technically inclined, enterprises were still wary of using the software, citing security fears and the need for holding a vendor accountable when something goes wrong. And investors would ask how a company could make money giving away the source code of its software at no cost.

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Red Hat generates $1 billion in revenue
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