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Fraud costs 2.1 percent of revenue


Rates of fraud dipped slightly this year, but more people are committing fraud

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Fraud cost companies 2.1 percent of earnings in the past 12 months with 60 percent committed by insiders, according to the latest survey

Fraud remains predominantly an inside job with, according to Kroll's annual global fraud report. The 2011 figures show that 60 percent of frauds are committed by insiders, up from 55 percent last year.

The research - which polled more than 1,200 senior executives worldwide - contained some good news, however. The research found a decline in the frequency of fraud over last year. Of the executives polled, 75 percent suffered some kind of fraud-related loss in the last 12 months, which is down from 88 percent the year prior.

"It's important to keep in mind these are only the cases in which the perpetrator is known," said Richard Plansky, senior managing director in Kroll's business intelligence and investigations practice.

"I think it's a fair inference that the percentage is actually significantly higher when we take into account all fraud cases. From what we are seeing her over the last seven years, this exact finding is a reflection of an economy that is increasingly information based."

And that translates into more concern among executives, Plansky said. Overall, fraud concerns among executives around the globe rose approximately 15 percent led by information theft and corruption and bribery.

Half of all companies surveyed said they are moderately to highly vulnerable to information theft, up from 38 percent in 2010. IT complexity is the leading cause of increasing fraud exposure, cited by 36 percent of respondents compared with 28 percent last year.

"Compared to just ten years ago, more and more the value of a company is not contained in tangible things, it's contained in the company's ideas, and those ideas tend to live on information systems in the form of digital data," said Plansky.

"That's where the value of companies lives and insiders have tremendous access to that information. Here's a place where technology is truly a double-edged sword. These wonderful sophisticated IT systems make critical data easy to access for a wide-range of employees. That's the upside. But the downside is also that it makes critical data easy to access for a wide-range of employees."

Indeed, information-based industries reported the highest incidence of theft of information and electronic data; including financial services (29 percent), technology, media and telecoms (29 percent), healthcare, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology (26 percent) and professional services (23 percent).

Roughly one in four companies were hit by physical theft of cash, assets and inventory or information theft, both down from 2010. Management conflict of interest (21 percent), vendor, supplier or procurement fraud (20 percent) and internal financial fraud (19 percent) all saw notable increases. The incidence of corruption and bribery nearly doubled over the past year from 10 to 19 percent.

Plansky said among some of the more surprising findings was that executives reported they felt unprepared to deal effectively with corruption. According to the survey, only 27 percent of respondents said they are well-prepared to comply with regulations, such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and UK Bribery Act.

Of those companies that are subject to one of these two laws, less than half (43 percent) have trained senior management, agents, vendors and foreign employees to be compliant with one of these laws, and just 39 percent have assessed the risks arising from them.

Only 37 percent of companies surveyed believe that their due diligence provides a sufficient understanding of a potential partner's or investment target's compliance with these acts.

"This is remarkable because the consequences of running afoul (of these laws) can be devastating," said Plansky. "

These respondents are sophisticated business people. They understand these are issues and it's causing anxiety. I think as a result you care going to see increased attention to this."

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